Heads in the Sand

As Americans, as human beings, it is essential we stand when necessary, kneel when necessary and even crawl when necessary.

When we stand when we should kneel, or kneel when we should stand, or crawl when standing and walking would have been better, is a great way to fail as a human being and as an American.

When we fail to allow those around us to act as their conscience dictates–that is the most un-American thing of all.

There is one other position that is worse than making a mess of the other choices, and that is keeping our heads in the sand.

Charles Buell

NOTHING HAPPENS!

Whatever is going on with this question about statues, likely has nothing to do with the actual statues or the people immortalized by them.

Whether the statues are of horses asses (and lots of them have horses in them) or of persons deemed worthy of being revered, they are all mostly stone, steel, brass or other materials longer lasting than the people could ever be themselves.

I personally cannot imagine wanting a statue of Mussolini or Rommel in my back yard, but having such a statue in itself means no more than the meaning we place on it.

If these objects incite persons to do bad things, there are laws in place to punish those scofflaws.

Statues can be reminders of how great the persons were or what crooks or horses’ asses they were.  Most probably do both things–depending on the viewer.

Regardless of who the statue portrays, not a single one is likely without sin, and birds shit on them all indiscriminately as they stand in the hot sun, rain, sleet and snow.

We should all be as birds and not take them so seriously.

The stories people create around statues is both an opportunity for discovery and awareness, but they can also exacerbate discord as they bump up against other people’s stories.

It is the stories that are the problem, not the statues.

History can teach, but only if we are willing to be students.

Guess what happens when you walk by a statue and ignore it?

Nothing happens.

Sometimes it is important to ignore ignorant people as well.

 

Charles Buell

Merry Every Thing!

While Christianity has “renamed” the season to suit its own purposes, the Winter Season truly is the “Season for All Humanity” regardless of religion. In many cases, in spite of religion.

Of course the fact “Christmas” includes Christ’s name, it is only logical the celebration of his birth would be deemed “Christmas.”  However most scholars agree it is highly unlikely Jesus was actually born on December 25–or even in the winter.

A more likely reason for the choice of that day for his birth was for a struggling upstart religious movement to usurp pagan seasonal rituals popular at the time.  If the coat tails are already in place, why not use them?

Contrary to popular belief (in predominately Christian parts of the world) the season is not “owned” by Christians. While some call their holiday “Christmas,” other holidays chosen by most of the rest of the world have equally valid names.  Names like, the Winter Solstice, Hanukkah, Yule, Kwanzaa and a many others.

In that sense, “Happy Holidays” could be considered the most “inclusive” of terms and more imperative to a world in desperate need of “anything” that helps us see how we are all on this planet together.

I am sure all the various holidays that have sprung up at this time of year have had an element of just “getting-me-through-the-night.” The longer nights and shorter days must have been quite an ordeal for people just trying to survive.  Add to that a bit of superstition, lack of education, and tyrannical special interests and you have the perfect recipe for the season becoming magical.

It is interesting that the only persons who seem to get their Christmas stockings all in a bunch about NOT calling the season the “Christmas Season” or saying “Merry Christmas” are Christians.  It is totally fine for them to call it Christmas and say Merry Christmas if they choose, just as it is fine for the rest of the world do not do so if they choose.

I am quite OK with our government’s tip-toeing around the words used related to the Holidays.  It is important that our government be for all of us–regardless our personal beliefs.

The various ways people choose to celebrate this change of seasons and entry into a New Year, is, and should be, as varied as the number of people there are to celebrate it.

If you find yourself among the 32% of the world’s population who identify themselves as “Christian,” and who insists “Merry Christmas” is the only correct way to say it, the remaining 68% of the world still manages to merrily and happily find their way into the New Year regardless.

Whether one says Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, Happy Holidays, Seasons Greetings–or Nothing at All—it is ALL good!

I kind of like the sign I saw in a store window the other day that said: “Merry Every Thing!”

So, MERRY EVERY THING EVERY ONE!

Charles Buell